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Marine Electronics & Communications

Marine Electronics & Communications

Next €4.5M sea traffic management project launched

Tue 05 Dec 2017 by Martyn Wingrove

Next €4.5M sea traffic management project launched
Ferry operations in Finland and Sweden will be assisted by sea traffic management in the EfficientFlow project

Scandinavia will take e-navigation a stage further after receiving €4.5M of funding from the European Union to start the next sea traffic management (STM) project.

EU is funding the equivalent of US$5.3M from the Interreg Central Baltic Programme for the EfficientFlow project that will be co-ordinated by the Swedish Maritime Administration.

EfficientFlow covers many aspects of STM in the ports of Rauma, Finland, and Gävle, Sweden. It also covers STM-enabled traffic flow management for the many ferries that sail through the archipelago between Sweden and Finland. The project will run from 2018 to 2020.

This project should contribute to more efficient traffic flow in the ScanMed corridor between Stockholm, Sweden, and Turku, Finland, by implementation of STM and its integration into the full logistic chain. 

Project partners include the Swedish Maritime Administration, Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, Port of Rauma, Port of Gävle and the Finnish Transport Agency.  

These partners expect EfficientFlow reduce the need for manual information exchange and improve processes and practical application of new ICT tools. They anticipate that this should lead to increased situational awareness among operators in the ports and ships sailing in the corridors.

 

Other benefits should be:

  • More connected ports,
  • Flexible route planning,
  • Improved port-hinterland information exchange,
  • Faster and more optimised port operations,
  • Improved just-in-time processes,
  • Fuel saving,
  • Less waiting times,
  • Improved planning horizon,
  • Improved berth productivity,
  • Increased flexibility in case of non-expected events. 

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